Thursday, September 19, 2019

The Massage Therapy Foundation's Research Webinar Series 2019

keywords: research literacy, massage therapy and bodywork, research basics, lunchtime listen recommendation

Research Thursday Spotlight: The Massage Therapy Foundation Research Webinar Series in 2019


http://massagetherapyfoundation.org
The Massage Therapy Foundation (research) and the NCBTMB (national massage therapy and bodywork association) have collaborated to create a webinar series on the basics of research in 2019. The first webinar aired in February 2019 with the episode, "Why Research?"

Go to their landing page to learn more about this Research Webinar Series.

There will be 3 parts to the series in 2019

  1. Part 1 was "Why Research?" (Feb 2019)
  2. Part 2 was "What is Research?" (July 2019)
  3. Part 3 will be "How to Find Quality Resources" (to be sometime in fall 2019)


The Massage Therapy Foundation is offering continuing education credit for watching these seminars. To take the quiz and get the credit, go to their website.

Part 1: "Why Research?" February 2019

Part 2: "What is Research?" July 2019


Related blogposts on Massage Therapy



For more on the topic of research

Other monthly research summary blogposts
Research Review posts
Research Resource Websites & Journals



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 buy me a coffee or sponsor a small Project via our website.  Thank you.

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Leadership and Workplace Mondays: August

keywords:  leadership, workplace, workplace culture, being an employee

Inspiration for Employees and their Leaders 

Review of the "Leadership and Workplace Mondays" theme from the public HHP Facebook Page



6 Project Management Tips: Useful for the Doctoral Student
Also useful for anyone working on a project, whether a research paper or setting up a program 

For those of you working on your PhD or other doctorate, 6 project management tips from the journal Nature:International Journal of Science, "Six Project Management Tips for your PhD" 
  1. Define a timeline
  2. Prepare for hiccups
  3. Define your project scope
  4. Add value vs. fluff—focus
  5. Define metrics of success—what does success look like and how will you measure it?
  6. Make progress by failing early
There are more articles in this series on the Nature website:

The National Academy of Medicine Makes the Case for the Chief Wellness Officer

Want to see more resources related to the workplace for hospital-based integrative health practitioners?



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For more recommended reading (books and audiobooks) on leadership, see our Reflecting on Leadership post.

More posts on Leadership

If this was useful, please support this community work.  
You can buy me a coffee, sponsor a newsletter, or sponsor a project via the website.
www.thehospitalhandbook.com

August Research Roundup

key words:  research literacy

Topics: 

The August Research Roundup

Review of the "Research and Metrics Thursdays" theme from the public Facebook Page and newsletter

At the Hospital Practice Handbook Project, we encourage practitioners to cultivate mentor-relationships and practice research literacy.


Community Survey: What Does Success Look Like in an Integrative Oncology Program?
Please share your wisdom and experience in the survey form. Thank you.

Research-related job postings (NCCIH)
  1. “Dr. Lauren Atlas’s laboratory is recruiting postdoctoral researchers with expertise in fMRI and affective science to join the Section on Affective Neuroscience and Pain to lead new projects on the psychological modulation of pain and emotional experience using high field imaging (7-Tesla MRI). Dr. Atlas’s lab is part of NCCIH’s new intramural program, and affiliated with the Intramural Research Programs of the National Institute on Mental Health (NIMH) and National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)." NCCIH job posting.
  2. Interested in working at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine? They have been posting job openings this summer. I haven't seen any specific to "acupuncturist", but if you have extra skills and training in research, writing, or program management and want to work there, here is their job listing board.

Research Articles
Three Special Focus Issues from JACM in 2019 to Review as related to Hospital-Based Practice
JACM, a peer reviewed scientific journal focused on integrative health care models, published special issue editions this past year (highlighted in this letter from the editor). If you missed them, the issues were on integrative oncology, whole systems approach to healthcare, and group delivered services.

Call out for Submissions on Palliative Care & Integrative Health
  • “In February 2020, JACM: Paradigm, Practice and Policy Advancing Integrative Health (The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine) will publish a Special Focus Issue on Integrative Palliative Care. The goal will be to enhance the natural synergy between integrative health and palliative medicine by drawing research and commentary that examine integrative palliative care."
  • Related articles to read for background on integrative health and palliative care synergy, JACM recommends this article from March 2019: 
  • Deadline for submissions: October 31st, 2019
  • Guidelines for submissions:
    • 1. Type of work.
      • original research and research reviews in the areas of integrative palliative methods, examinations of multimodal approaches, implementation-related studies including exploration of cost and business models issues, and education research. Other submissions related to this list may be considered, but send JACM your query before officially submitting your work.
    • 2. When submitting, select the "special issue on integrative palliative care" manuscript category
    • 3. Word limits. For original manuscripts 3,000 words or less. For systematic reviews 4,500 words or less. However, title, abstract, acknowledgments, disclosures, references, and figure legends don't count toward the word limit.
    • 4. Commentaries accepted. 500 words or less. topic: reflecting on the next steps for integrative palliative care. Such as controversies in the field, unusual experiences (not case reports), models of care, educational models, etc. Focus on what the challenges and opportunities are for this field at this moment in history.
  • Read the announcement here and submit your work soon!


Metrics: Patient Outcomes
Are you tracking your patient outcomes?
UH Connor integrative health programs are tracking theirs!
If you are working in an integrative health program you are tracking some metrics, right? Which metrics are you tracking? If this is news to you, read this article about UH Connor's integrative health program and find more resources in this blog by following the tags "metrics" and "research literacy".  Happy reading!
"The Science Behind Integrative Health"
excerpt: "Meet Jeffery A. Dusek, PhD, Director of Research, UH Connor Integrative Health Network. When integrative health is offered within an academic medical center as the UH Connor Integrative Health Network (CIHN) is at UH, understanding the data and science behind its treatments and therapies is crucial. As Francoise Adan, MD, Medical Director of CIHN says, 'While we have hundreds of outstanding patient testimonials from the past several years, those don't gain you reimbursement, or credibility with doubting physicians.' " Read more in this UH article.
Metrics: Clinician Employee Burnout & Employee Well-Being
Are you interested in measuring burnout or well-being?
There are validated metrics for this.  The National Academy of Medicine has created a resource page with all the validated tools for measuring clinician burnout and clinician well-being.
Interested in Measuring Your Work?
  • Learn more about the importance of metrics in your work by following the Hospital Handbook Project. We are currently tagging blog posts related to metrics with "metrics". You can use the search feature in the blog and type in "metrics" to find related posts.
  • If the term "metrics" and/or "performance management metrics" are new to you, sign up for our new series, Basics of Being an Employee in aHealthcare System: Performance Metrics. We have finished recording the series. Just doing the slow work of video editing and note taking. If you sign up, you will be notified when any of it is next published. More information about that here.

Reviewing Research Basics and Their Practical Application for the Healthcare Clinician


Humanism in Healthcare: Patient-Centered-ness and Clinician Resilience

Research Conferences



NCCIH at 20: A Catalyst for Integrative Health Research,
a One Day Conference with the NCCIH Stephen E. Straus lecture
"NCCIH at 20" conference agenda, Sept.2019
  • Date: 9.23.2019
  • You can register for the webcast of this conference at the NCCIH event page
  • This year’s Stephen E. Straus lecture in the science of complementary therapies is: “Why We Need a Pain Revolution: From Science to Practice” with Lorimer Moseley, PhD, professor of clinical neurosciences and chair in physiotherapy at the University of South Australia.
“Dr. Moseley will present the…underlying six target concepts…at the heart of the Pain Revolution, a community pain education and capacity-building program focusing on rural and regional Australia.”
Funding Announcements
  • The Society of Acupuncture Research (SAR) posted an easy-to-read blogpost on all the current NIH acupuncture research funding announcements.  

    For more on the topic of research

    Other monthly research summary blogposts
    Research Review posts
    Research Resource Websites & Journals



    Did you find this information useful or interesting?
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    for "research and metrics Thursdays" on the public Facebook Page.

    You can support this community-wisdom-sharing work by
     buying me a coffee or sponsoring a newsletter via our website.  Thank you.

    Research Literacy Basics: Practical Applications for the Hospital-Based Practitioner

    keywords: research literacy, reviewing the basics, poster presentations, grand rounds, basics of submitting a piece to a peer-reviewed journal
    www.thehospitalhandbook.com


    Review of Research Basics and the Practical Applications (at your job) as a Healthcare Clinician

    A Resource Page for the Acupuncturist in Hospital-Based Practice 

    Also useful information for any acupuncturist interested in presenting their professional work at a conference, in a peer-reviewed journal, or to other healthcare providers working in a healthcare system


    Interested in research or in submitting your hard work to a peer reviewed journal but haven't been successful yet or not sure where to start?

    • Here are some resources for reviewing some important research literacy basics in the field of integrative health and especially in the field of acupuncture and east Asian medicine
    • You can find more resources by following these keywords or tags in the blog: research literacy and metrics


    Are you looking to connect with a mentor to guide you through becoming a clinician-researcher? 



    Reviewing the Basics

      What is Well-Designed Research?
      On Writing a Scientific Paper
      Posters and Poster Presentations
      For more on the topic of research

      Other monthly research summary blogposts
      Research Review posts
      Related Subjects
      • Grand Rounds
      • Project ECHO of the University of New Mexico, a unique tele-health/tele-seminar wisdom-share program for hospital-based practitioners in specialty care (IPMCs, any specialty on the ECHO lineup) and rural primary care health centers
      • Shadowing Physicians
      Research Resource Websites & Journals


      Did you find this information useful or interesting?
      Subscribe to our email list for the latest updates and follow us
      for "research and metrics Thursdays" on the public Facebook Page.

      You can support this community-wisdom-sharing work by
       buying me a coffee or sponsoring a newsletter via our website.  Thank you.

      Wednesday, September 4, 2019

      Survey: What Does Success Look Like in an Integrative Oncology Program?

      keywords and phrases: acupuncturists in oncology programs, hospital-based acupuncturists, integrative oncology, community surveys, metrics

      www.thehospitalhandbook.com


      Community Survey this Month: 

      For those of you working in oncology/cancer care or a large % of your patient care is oncology/cancer care, this community survey is for you!

      Please share the survey link with colleagues who can add their wisdom.

      Survey Link

      Suspense Date: respond by Oct. 1st, 2019

      Goal: Learn about the current standards and metrics for integrative oncology programs, focus on the work of licensed acupuncturists

      How will this info be used?
      1. Continue discussion in the community about the following topics: using metrics in clinical care, finding relevant metrics for your work, how integrative oncology programs are being set up, maintained, and grown
      2. When enough information gathered, will create summary document(s) available to the discussion community and a public blog post summary via the blog 
      3. Follow up interview potential about specific programs for those interested in participating, part of the "issues in hospital practice" community webinar/interview series. For more about this special Project series, go here.  


      Why this survey
      • Integrative oncology programs have been growing quickly in the last 5 years. I usually field questions to those practitioners in the community who are working in oncology, but the rate of queries coming in have increased in rate and complexity. To the point I feel it would help us and the people-with-questions if I wrote up a summary of the community wisdom to share both in the discussion groups and in a blog post. 
      • I still feel it is necessary to connect people entering these programs or, especially, those creating/standing up these programs to connect to potential mentors in the community. This does not substitute the person-connection/mentor-relationship building. It will, I hope, provide a softer landing spot for those who are in the “waiting place” to connect with their very busy mentors. Softer landing spot = basic background on the subject, resources to read and review, etc.


      So, without further ado! Would you fill out this survey to share your wisdom before October 1st?
      Thank you. 🏥🦋🙂☕️


      If you are a student or practitioner in the field and are interested in connecting to mentors or programs,
      1. First check out our Hospital based Practice Learning Opportunities Directory.
      2. Then, if the options in the directory don't fit your need, you can contact me via the website with your query. 


      Related Blogpost




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       buying me a coffee or sponsoring a newsletter via our website.  Thank you.

      Monday, September 2, 2019

      Metrics in Pediatrics and Medical Herstory: Dr. Virginia Apgar

      keywords: metrics, pediatrics, medical history, Dr. Virginia Apgar


      Metrics in Pediatrics and Medical History: Dr. Virginia Apgar
      • Hospital-based practice her-story tidbit with Dr. Virginia Apgar and the APGAR metric for infants:
      While working at “Sloane Hospital for Women with laboring and new mothers [Dr. Apgar noticed] that medical personnel had no standardized way to assess the health of newborn babies. Although mortality for children under a year old had been going down in the U.S. between the 1930s and 1950s, the rate of death among newborns had remained constant, in part because doctors weren't identifying babies who were at risk. In a 1953 paper, Apgar proposed a test to assess infant health on five criteria: heart rate, respiration, color, muscle tone, and reflex irritability. Within a few years, the test was becoming broadly adopted and had become known as the Apgar Score, a mnemonic learning aid based on its inventor's last name which stands for Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, Respiration. Due to its effectiveness and simplicity, the Apgar Score was widely used by hospitals throughout the United States by the 1960s and is now used by doctors throughout the world.” [emphasis added]

      References

      Related Information
      • Are you an acupuncturist and want to learn more about working in labor and delivery (L&D)? Then check out the highly rated post graduate studies on this subject with Claudia Citkovitz, PhD, LAc.
      • For more about metrics and clinical outcome measures used in clinical practice, following the blogpost tag "metrics".
      • For more about pediatrics in hospital practice for acupuncturists, use the search feature on this blog and type in "pediatrics". 



      Did you find this information useful or interesting?
      Subscribe to our email list for the latest updates and follow us
       on the public Facebook Page.

      You can support this community-wisdom-sharing work by
       buying me a coffee or sponsoring a newsletter via our website.  Thank you.

      Summer Health Policy News Roundup

      keywords: health policy


      The Summer 2019 Health Policy News Roundup


      • Medicare acupuncture coverage update, the July 2019 decision was in the “receiving comments” period until 8.15.2019.  
      • Joint Commission blog post update on home health program measures and hospice measures
      • How a recent U.S. Health Policy Addresses Social Determinants of Health
        • The following July 2019 study, "Perspectives of Medicare Advantage Plan Representatives on Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Response to the CHRONIC Care Act" looked at how these insurance companies were responding to the Medicare incentive from innovative ideas to limits, including coverage of integrative health services.
        • Why This Policy Change and Its Implementation is Important
          • More than 1/3 of Medicare beneficiaries are enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans. These plans, under the 2018 CHRONIC Care Act must address these members’ social determinants of health through supplemental benefits (such as acupuncture and other integrative health modalities with an evidence base).
        • Challenges these companies have when they are innovating new patient care coverage plans that address social determinants of health:
          • finding strong evidence base for types of clinical care or procedures that show improved patient outcomes 
          • finding evidence base for cost-effectiveness 
          • finding partners who can provide these evidence-based services
          • getting clear guidance from CMS about what is permitted
        • Read more at the blog...
      • Public Health Policy




      Did you find this information useful or interesting?
      Subscribe to our email list for the latest updates and follow us
       on the public Facebook Page.

      You can support this community-wisdom-sharing work by
       buying me a coffee or sponsoring a newsletter via our website.  Thank you.